All posts by analogphotobug

Research Scientist & Analog Photographer

Through The Glass: Patience

By the time you read this we will be on our way back to the Phoenix Mayo Clinic for the next 30 days. We made arrangements to stay at the Condos we had used before.

After talking to the second neuro-surgery teleconference it was decided to run some additional tests before scheduling surgery. I will tell you that I had started the steroid therapy and there was some improvement, especially for my left eye. Undoubtably this is the source of my extended testing.

Now I have the results or a preliminary evaluation…..Surgery now or Later? The vote for surgery later (maybe). We are in a wait and see mode hoping to stabilized my vision and move forward. I wii definitely ready to hear that news.

So I am off into the Mountains for a drive today. Still testing ‘old cameras’ and ‘new’ films. Taking it easy for the rest of this year. And can I Say “Hallelujah, Amen”!

Frugal Fim Project: August 2020

A Trip to the top of my world. Loveland Pass is my Favorite High Mountain Pass.\:

Checkout my Frugal Film Posting for the details………

Cow Doors in the Fields……

A local farmer decided to paint their shed for the live stock and landscape…….

This was an images originally shot for my Frugal Film Project. But as always, too many options to post their…….So Shared Here Instead.

1934 Agfa Billy Clack No. 51 Unboxing

I looked back at my archive and found that I’ve only posted a couple of my Pre-1940’s Camera Unboxings. Well, the Agfa 645 (a.k.a. the Billy Clack No. 51) from circa 1934 is making it’s first major appearance for the Frugal Film Project Tri-X 400 year end finale. So you first must experience the ‘Grand Unboxing’.

I’ve removed identification to protect privacy. But I did want you to know that this gem came from Slovakia……

And it was very well packed:

This one happened to come with a nice case:

So let’s take a look at what’s inside………

And taking a look inside. We see that it is a Portrait-style 645 camera design:

And the Final Camera loaded and ready to go! By the way, this IS a 120 film camera and shoots 16 images.

So you will be seeing posting for Frugal Film OCt-Nov_Dec 2020 from this camera. And good ‘extra’ prints will also be posted. If you would like more details about the Billy Clack No. 51, like where the name come from, visit the link at Art Deco Cameras.

Santa Catalina Casino

First, let’s clarify the meaning of Casino. It really just means a gathering place, not a pace to gamble. ThenCasino At Santa Catalina Island is a music hall.

There are many interesting windows and doors. These are the two main entrances.

And the Ticket Window between the Main Doors.

And finally, the Back Door with a Tourist Guest:

Dear Blogger Friends, as you read this posting I will be returning from a Vision Evaluation at the Mayo Clinic. Long, long journey. You can catch on some of it Saturday when I post another ‘Through the Glass’ update.

Through The Glass: The Long Journey Continues…….

Back to the Mayo Clinic after my local Drs agrrd that they had no immediate explanation for my blindness in the keft eye……

Please Keep me in your Thoughts and Prayers…….

Kodak Autographic Time Test

I finally did a proper time test (or in this case an f-stop test) for the Kodak Autographic;

I was testing the Fuji Velvia 50. Because it is a slow film I decided to try my Velvia 50 as the color film for my pre-1940 cameras, Here are the results. The f-stop range is 4, 8, 16, 32. I took two scenes. Scene 1 is a partially shaded path in a local park: Coal Creek Park.

The f/4.0 (first image) and the f/8.0 (second image) are both acceptable. The f/32 is definitely too dark, Results are similar for the stream shot from the same park.

So for the Kodak Autographic No.1 using the Fuji Velvia 50 film, either f/4.0 or f/8.0 depending on the lighting conditions. In very bright light one might consider try f/16.

Thoughts on the Reveni Light Meter

The Reveni Labs hot shoe Light Meter is the smallest one we’ve found.  But adding ‘mini’ to the name was entirely my idea.  It was a Kickstarter that my husband joined a few months ago, and I have to say one that I’ve been most pleased with.

The Reveni Light Meter has an excellent downloadable .PDF manual that starts with the basics of metering and proceeds through to the specifics of this light meter’s operation.  Each orders includes a certificate as shown above.  I’ll spare you the full description, because the manual can be examined before you make a purchase.  A summary of the key feature are below:

The Reveni Light Meter has an excellent downloadable .PDF manual that starts with the basics of metering and proceeds through to the specifics of this light meter’s operation.  Each orders includes a certificate as shown above.  I’ll spare you the full description, because the manual can be examined before you make a purchase.  A summary of the key feature are below:

The Reveni Meter has an ambient reflective meter with a 45 degree cone sensor field.   It has a bright OLED display with simple menu and controls (shown below).  It has aperture or shutter speed priority settings.  Exposure compensation can be set in steps of 1/3 stops in a range of -2 to +2.

Example display of f/16 and an exposure of 4 seconds, representing measurement of the red background material.

The Reveni uses a LR44 battery.  It weighs 9 grams including the battery.  The first battery is provided (at least for the Kickstarter version). The dimensions: 0.92 in (22.5 mm) x 0.86 in (21.8 mm) x 0.71 in (17.8 mm).  Now with the basics in hand, let’s get to the testing.

Light Meter Testing

To test the Reveni Meter I first compared it to my recently refurbished Minolta SRT-101, which included a light meter recalibration.  I mounted my f/1.7, 50 mm normal lens for the test.  I was exposing Kodak T-MAX 400 @ ISO 200 (E.I. 200).  Sometimes I held the f/-stop constant and changed the shutter speed and sometimes I held the shutter sped constant and changed the f/-stop.  In both cases my results were consistent.  The Minolta Meter was 1/2 to a full stop over exposed compared to the Reveni Meter results in medium to dimmer light.  The exposure difference could be as much as 2 f/-stops in bright light or with a lot of glare, as with the first example below. The Reveni doesn’t handle glare as well as the in-camera meter

Both meters agree for the wide open landscapes……..as above.

I also happened to have my X-700 loaded with Ilford HP5 @ ISO 400 (E.I. 400) with a roll of film that I wanted to finish.  I had been using this camera to photograph my Birthday Bouquet.  So I snapped on the Reveni Meter and did a few comparison images.  Here is one example below.  The X-700 meter showed a full 2-stop difference.

Final Thoughts

In general, I trust my 35 mm in-camera light meters, especially my refurbished SRT-101 and SRT-202, which were both re-calibrated.  And the in-camera meters seemed to handle bright light and glare better.  That said, I find no faults with the Reveni Meter and can think of two special cases where I will definitely use it.  I have two wonderful cameras that are fully manual with no light meters:  my Mamiya 1000s (645 format) and my FujiFilm GW690-III (6X9 mm format).  Usually I ‘guess-timate’ an exposure using the sunny-16 reference.  But, I’m not alway photographing in bright sunlight, and multiple bracketing exposures are not practical for the GW690-III which only has 8-shots per roll.  The Reveni Meter also offer a number of meter carrying options for cameras like the 1000s, that do not have a hot shoe.    So they have it all covered.  Be on the lookout for future works featuring these cameras and the Reveni Light Meter.

Technical Summary:

Speed: 1hr – 1/8000th sec in 1 stop increments

Aperture Range: F0.7 – f1024 in 1 stop increments

Film ISO Range: ISO 1 – ISO 12800, see “Setting Film ISO” for full list

Speed: 1hr – 1/8000th sec in 1 stop increments

Aperture Range: F0.7 – f1024 in 1 stop increments

Film ISO Range: ISO 1 – ISO 12800, see “Setting Film ISO” for full list

EV Shutter Range: EV 2 – EV 19.5 in 0.1EV increments (@ISO 100)

EV Shutter Range: EV 2 – EV 19.5 in 0.1EV increments (@ISO 100)

Note: Hamish Gill has published a detail and technically oriented review of the REVENI which can be found HERE. Turns out he;s friends withe developer and saw earlier models. Oh well, I had a;ready written this and decided to share it with my followers.