Tag Archives: History

The “Lost Roll” of Film Adventure

This is the story of my second roll of film through the 1913 Kodak No.1.  I roll I shot on Pinhole Day (although it was not a pinhole).  I was still testing the camera so I carried it along…..You can see some results from my first roll of film here.

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I mailed my second roll, Ilford Ortho Plus (ISO 80) on April 28th and waited…..and waited……and waited.  By the end of May I was beginning to worry so I contacted them.  Well, you can read the correspondence at the end, I want to move on to the photos.  But it suffices to say that it took them 3+ months to find my film and they returned it with no acknowledgment of the problems and no apologies.  So They’ve lost my business, permanently.  Oh, I’ll use their film, but I won’t send it to them for processing.

Anyway, let’s move on……….Ans start with my Favorite Crucifix:

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This was the original Cemetery for Denver.  And it was segregated by religion and race.  This was the Orthodox Section:

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Another favorite Monument above……

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I forget what the tree trunk symbolizes, but it is a XXXXXX

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A view of the larger Cemetery Area………….above. There is another shot taken at another location.  So I will show that separately in a couple of days…….

Now for the horror of my former Film Lab.  Click on the image to enlarge and read:

Use Ilford Labs US at your own risk.  What I really resent is the lack of an Apology or any acknowledgment of a problem when they finally did find my film.

I’ll stick with OldSchoolLabs.  They do 90% of my work (we develop the other 10% ourselves) ……..I can certainly endorse them.

 

 

Frugal Film Project: June 2020

Finally Getting to Post this.  And Yes, I am counting it as a #WednesdayWindows Also!

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Pat and Gar’s Hi-Way Bar

Now for some Lafayette, Colorado History: The Old Coke Sign from ‘Pat & Gar’s Hi-Way Bar’ was originally painted in late 1949 or early 1950. Underneath are several layers of signs and banners going back to the late 1930’s. Renovations in 1956 covered the mural with asbestos siding, which ended up preserving it.

In 2015 the Mural was uncovered by special asbestos remediation before the building was to be demolished. The rediscovered Mural, and the entire wall were removed and stored at the Lafayette Firehouse. Professional restoration experts were brought in to stabilize the mural in 2016. It was placed in the current location, at Simpson and Public Road in Downtown Lafayette, Colorado.

See the Official Frugal Film Posting…….

Photos from the Kodak Art Deco Jiffy 127 Camera

Yesterday you were introduced to the Camera.  Today you meet the best 5-Frames from the very first roll of Reva 127 B&W film (ISO 100).  I was amazed at the results considering that I knew very little about the Camera, and this is my first roll.

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First a re-intro to the Camera above.  Details about the camera can be found on the Art Deco Camera Site.  Now let’s look at my camera test location: Lake Waneka.  We’ll start with a new view, looking west from the Boat House:

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Below, my usual view looking east towards the Boat House:

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Below, the beginnings of our COVID-19 Rock Monument.  There are more rocks now…….

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My Classic Boat Dock View.  Today featuring a fisherman……

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And my Classic Tree Reflection that you’ve seen in other Camera Tests:

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And certainly consistent with My Inner Monet Theme.

Fresh From the 1930’s: My Art Deco Camera

First the Grand Unboxing of my Kodak Jiffy 127 Art Deco Model, produced between  1935-1942.  I do not know the exact date of my Camera.  But let’s not waste time with that.

It came with the original Box.  Note the Eastman Kodak Camera Logo from the Art Deco Era:

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Made from Bakelite, the First Plastic, synthesized in 1907.

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And in A couple of days, the results from my first Roll using Reva ISO 100 B&W Film.

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Note that the Link at the top (and here) has a fairly comprehensive description of the camera. The condition of this camera suggests that it was a display model and never actually used.

Retrospective: The Doors of Ft Lupton

There are many ‘Forts” in Colorado.  But none of them were military outposts.  Instead, these were fortified trading posts for Indigenous Peoples and early Trappers.

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Fort Lupton has been completely reconstructed on a site adjacent to the original location.  It was established in 1836 by Lancaster Lupton, a former soldier and West Point Graduate. Click on the link above for the details of the Founding of the Fort.   He had passed through the area with the Dodge-Leavenworth Expedition in 1834.

Trading Gate, interior, the Natives were kept in this smaller area and never allowed into the main Fort.

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The Watch Tower Interior & Exterior:

Private Dwelling Door:

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Check out the History of Ft Collins, Ft Morgan, Bent’s Fort and there are more Forts, some even were military…………

Juneteenth 2020

My husband was picking up packages at our PostNet shop.  A women had these signes printed to pass out to friends, family, and whoever she might meet.  He asked her for one and it it now in our front yard:

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And a Flower to Honor all who have died recently at the hand’s of the Police……..RIP:

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Learn More About Juneteenth Here.…….

Retrospective: Mission Santa Ines

And of course a Door because it is Thursday……The side entry photographed better than the Main Entrance.  You may have noticed that this is Infrared.Mission_Side_Door1Mission_Side_Door2

Mission Santa Ines is located next to Solvang, California.  It was founded in 1804. I was visiting a friend in Santa Barbara back in 2017 when I made this visit.  I decided to use my Nikon-1, which was converted to full spectrum by KolariVision.  I then used an IR filter to limit the exposure to Infrared.

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Church was in session, so I wandered around outside and focussed my photography there.  Obviously a full house with people standing in the doorway.

Views around the Courtyard,  Above Left to Right: St Francis, Shrine to Santa Ines, Jesus.

Finally, below, the Cemetery:

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I had the Nikon-1 converted after much frustration with IR-films.  I do use IR-Sensitive Films and you’ll see some film tests coming soon.

Retrospectives are repostings of significant works from my old Photo Diary……….

And, some thought from yesterday’s Photo Diary on Windows and Walls……

From My 100 Year Old Camera

I recently purchased a Kodak No. 1 Autographic Junior 13340 from Etsy (Patent dates 1910-1913). What could have gone wrong with that!  But low and behold , I am learning to make it work.  And Conveniently this is a version that can accommodate 120 film. I was inspired by old family cameras to buy this one, but that’s another story:

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And the Photos:

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Still learning to focus….but I’m getting there…….next photos should be better.

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And remember to check out the ‘Grand Unboxing‘.

Grand Unboxing: Kodak No. 1 Autographic Junior 13340

You may ask what possessed me to buy a circa 100 year old camera and expect it to work!  Especially one bought on Etsy, right?  Well my next post will allow you to make that judgement for yourself.  But for now, lets enjoy the ‘Grand Unboxing’:

 

A recent Petapixel article discusses a bit about the camera, but see the info for specs at the end.   Now for our first view of the camera:

 

The 120 film model was produced from 1913-1927.  I’m still investigating the exact age of mine, but it appears to be a 1913 model. Excellent!

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Special Autographic Features.  But be aware that you really can’t use this feature anymore.  It required special film.

 

Read the Specs at Camerapedia:

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From An Old Slave Market

This post is inspired by a recent Atlas Obscura article about the Documentation and Preservation of Plantation Slave Cabins.  At the Underground Railroad Museum in Cincinnati, Ohio (My Hometown).  It is from a Slave Market in Kentucky.  After the Civil War, with the end of Slavery, the building had been used to cure tobacco.  It was so well constructed, that when the farmer wanted to expand his ‘barn’, he built the new barn around it rather than trying to tear it down.

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When the Museum was under development, the story of the Slave Market Building came to their attention.  The Current Farmer wanted a new barn, but also knew the probable history of the strange building inside the old barn.  Somehow the Farmer and Museum made contact.  The Museum torn down the old barn, removed the historic Market Building, and built the Farmer a new barn. Later, the State of Kentucky was upset to lose this historic structure.  But it is well preserved now in the Museum Lobby.

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Another Place of Interest is the Hermitage Plantation, home of President Andrew Jackson.  This is one of the few plantations where Slave Cabins were openly Preserved and Acknowledged.

Since I found this article at the end of Black History Month,  I am posting it in Honor of my Father’s Birthday Today.  And I think this counts as a #WednesdayWindows posting too.