Tag Archives: Inspiration

What the Irises Tell Us About Velvia 50 and E100 Films

The Irises display more of a difference, being both richer is color and truer to the colors I saw. You’ll have to trust me on that.  I had intended to make Portra 400 images for all the garden shots, but that camera malfunctioned.  However, I do have some Portra 400 35 mm images.  One posted ant the end for comparison.  As before, you’ll have to make your choice based on which color balance you prefer.

We will start with Yellow Irises, since we did see a difference in the Yellow Tulips:

 

As before, the E100 is on the left and the Velvia 50 is on the right.  You can see the richer saturation in the Velvia 50.  Something that we are expecting.

 

Varying the contrast and brightness had no affect on the absolute color, which is what we are interested in here.

Now we move on to Purple, which was a color that Velvia 50 favored in previous examples:

 

As before, E100 on the left and Velvia 50 on the right…….

 

For me, the Velvia yields a more attractive color and is closer to what I saw.  Now let me tell you a little secret.  Once in a Physics experiment in college, it showed that I tend to see a little bit into the UV spectrum.  That is probably why the richer purples appeal more to me.

However, if you want truer color I think we have to get out the Portra 400 (below).  Again, I think it is an aesthetic choice…….

 

Portra_Purple_Iris

Inner Monet and the #CameraChallenge

I am a frequent participant in the #CameraChallenge.  The April offering included a motion challenge which fits My Inner Monet.  My strategy for ‘Motion’ was slow shutter speeds and simple motion.  I used the Diana F+ camera and Lomo 800 film, as I was photographing for the April Frugal Film Project.

Wind_Walk

Above:  a walk in the wind, and Below: mountain drive by.

Mountain_Drive_By

Prelim Discussion of IR-Sensitive B&W Films Part II: Washi-Z ISO 400

Arcosanti_Yucca

Washi-Z 400, above with a dark red filter.  I start with that statement because for some reason I didn’t shoot the first few images with dark red.  Instead I had used an orange filter for some reason:

Piestewa_Peak

Washi-Films were never intended for use in still cameras.  They were specialty films and most were developed for recording some type of motion, including a sound version.But nowadays these specialty films are creeping into the revitalized 35 mm film market.

And finally, two images from the Tonto Natural Bridge in Arizona.  Representing some of the early orange filter exposures.

So now what?  I’ve ordered more Washi-Z 400, and because the IR effect did not seem that strong, even with the red filter.  I’m going to try it with the IR-695 filter.  Watch for new results coming soon……

Washi_Test

Juneteenth 2020

My husband was picking up packages at our PostNet shop.  A women had these signes printed to pass out to friends, family, and whoever she might meet.  He asked her for one and it it now in our front yard:

Juneteenth1

And a Flower to Honor all who have died recently at the hand’s of the Police……..RIP:

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Learn More About Juneteenth Here.…….

Retrospective: Mission Santa Ines

And of course a Door because it is Thursday……The side entry photographed better than the Main Entrance.  You may have noticed that this is Infrared.Mission_Side_Door1Mission_Side_Door2

Mission Santa Ines is located next to Solvang, California.  It was founded in 1804. I was visiting a friend in Santa Barbara back in 2017 when I made this visit.  I decided to use my Nikon-1, which was converted to full spectrum by KolariVision.  I then used an IR filter to limit the exposure to Infrared.

Mission_Santa_Ines1

Church was in session, so I wandered around outside and focussed my photography there.  Obviously a full house with people standing in the doorway.

Views around the Courtyard,  Above Left to Right: St Francis, Shrine to Santa Ines, Jesus.

Finally, below, the Cemetery:

Mission_Cemetery1Mission_Cemetery2

I had the Nikon-1 converted after much frustration with IR-films.  I do use IR-Sensitive Films and you’ll see some film tests coming soon.

Retrospectives are repostings of significant works from my old Photo Diary……….

And, some thought from yesterday’s Photo Diary on Windows and Walls……

Prelim Discussion of IR-Sensitive B&W Films Part I: SFX-200 and Retro 80S

I typically use Ilford SFX-200 as my IR-Sensitive film.  When I started, I used it with my darkest red filter:

But now I use my IR-695 filter:

 

Recently I’ve had two IR-sensitive film come my way: Rollei Retro 80S and Washi-Z.  Let’s start with the Rollei film. Because of my positive experience using the 695 filter, I tried this with the Retro 80S.  It resulted in interesting but very high contrast images:

Retro_80S_Cathedral2

Compare this to T-MAX 400 with a Dark Red filter (sorry that’s the film I had in the other Mamiya-7 at the time):

TMAX_400_Cathedral2

Here a direct comparison of the same scene, SFX-200 and Retro 80S, both with the IR-695 filter:

Retro_80S_Cathedral1SFX_Cathedral1

Can you tell which is which? The Retro 80S is the upper image, the SFX-200 is the lower image.  The SFX image preserves the fine high altitude clouds better…..

I have recently read an article on the Retro 80S, where the author only used the dark red filter.    @EMULSIVEfilm also has another recent article comparing Retro 80S and Retro 400S, again both using the dark red filter.  So now I’m going to embark on a set of side by side Retro and SFX images making, using only the dark red filter.  Can’t wait to see what happens……

IR_Filrm_Test_120

Washi-Z discussion coming in Part II.

Kodak E100 vs. Fuji Velvia 50: The Showdown Begins

I have to admit that I was disappointed with early my 35 mm E100 results.  I felt that the film was cold and realized that it was based on the old E100G, a film I only used with a warming filter.  My favorite of the old Kodak E-6 films was E100GX, the warm toned film.  I used it extensively in Patagonia and mourned its loss.  You can also check out our first Patagonia Calendar.

But I digress.  Let’s get back to the purpose of this study: Kodak E100 versus Fuji Velvia 50.  After my E100 doubts I happened upon this old Velvia 50 image of Boreas Pass and thought about a comparative test:

BoreasChasingFall

So I set up my two Mamiya 6X7’s for the test.  There was one difference:  The Velvia 50 camera had a 43 mm lens and the E100 camera had a 50 mm lens.  We can debate if that makes a difference, but for Showdown Part II, I’ll be using matching camera set ups.  So hold your argument for later.

Here are the side-by-sides: Think about which is which and I’ll tell you at the end.Peacocks_E100Peacocks_Velvia50

Owl_E100Owl_Velvia50

Details regarding what I learned from this Owl are discussed in my next posting…………

Coke_E100Coke_Velvia50

In all cases the top image is Kodak E100 and the bottom image is Fuji Velvia 50.  There were no adjustments made to color balance.  You may note that the Velvia 50 images are more color saturated and have some purple or pink in the sky.  The E100 is less saturated and has a colder sky. Now it’s up to you.  Which do you prefer?  Keep in mind that this is an overcast sky.  So I’ll add one more pair.  I wanted to capture my purple house, but in the morning the house was too dark.  But you can see that with a clear sky the Velvia 50 (bottom image) has the saturated blue sky:

Sky_E100Sky_Velvia50

The snow is still holding that purple cast in the Velvia 50 image.  E100 has a truer presentation of the snow.  Comments, perspectives appreciated.

Next, we’ll take a look at my Garden Flowers using my Mamiya 645’s both with 80 mm macro lenses..  Since I have something blooming all summer, I’m shooting two rolls of each film throughout my gardening season, and I’ll post as I go……..

From My 100 Year Old Camera

I recently purchased a Kodak No. 1 Autographic Junior 13340 from Etsy (Patent dates 1910-1913). What could have gone wrong with that!  But low and behold , I am learning to make it work.  And Conveniently this is a version that can accommodate 120 film. I was inspired by old family cameras to buy this one, but that’s another story:

Autograph_Posted1

And the Photos:

Auto_TheBoatDock1

Still learning to focus….but I’m getting there…….next photos should be better.

Auto_BoatHouseReflection

And remember to check out the ‘Grand Unboxing‘.

Grand Unboxing: Kodak No. 1 Autographic Junior 13340

You may ask what possessed me to buy a circa 100 year old camera and expect it to work!  Especially one bought on Etsy, right?  Well my next post will allow you to make that judgement for yourself.  But for now, lets enjoy the ‘Grand Unboxing’:

 

A recent Petapixel article discusses a bit about the camera, but see the info for specs at the end.   Now for our first view of the camera:

 

The 120 film model was produced from 1913-1927.  I’m still investigating the exact age of mine, but it appears to be a 1913 model. Excellent!

Autograph_Posted1

 

Special Autographic Features.  But be aware that you really can’t use this feature anymore.  It required special film.

 

Read the Specs at Camerapedia:

Unboxing_Final

My Inner Monet: Valentine Flowers One Month Later

It had been more than a month.  But I did make these images in March as I watched my Valentine Roses change, but not ‘fade away’.  They simply revealed new aspects of My Inner Monet:

One_Month_Later

I had though about submitting these for the March Frugal Film Project, but decided not to.  But what I might do is find a 5th image that that works and submit it to a 5-Frames…..

One_Month2

So we end the month with these Roses as a prepare a Photo Safari to my friend’s Rose Garden…..

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