Tag Archives: Mamiya

Como Doors

We made our annual trip over Boreas Pass. At the south end of the Pass is the town of Como. There are inhabited and restored buildings, such a the Train Station:

But I think many of the abandoned buildings are more interesting:

And them there are the somewhat restored and used buildings:

See More Pictures of Como and the Boreas Pass RailRoad here. Also a lot more doors!

Retrospective: Loveland Pass

Here is the second look back at my last roll of Kodak E100GX. This time from Loveland Pass.

Looking Towards the North…..
Looking South towards Arapahoe Basin just around the corner to the right.

Retrospective: Longs Peak

Over the next few Retrospective postings I’ll be sharing my last few roll of Kodak E100GX from 2011. I start here with a view of Longs Peak from Rocky Mountain National Park:

Have a Relaxing Labor Day

Walker Ranch Doors

I’ve done a lot of photography at Walker Ranch.  I’ve printed and displayed some too, but never focussed on the Doors…….So Let’s Go Crazy at the Ranch for this week’s Thursday Doors!

Walker_Ranch_B1

A close-up of the Featured Door (above) and the Featured Door (below).

Walker_Ranch_B1A

Walker_Ranch_A

Two of my favorite Doors (above and below).

Walker_Ranch_C

And, below, some general shots around the Ranch, but still with doors visible….

Walker_Ranch_EWalker_Ranch_D

My Lomo Purple Scanning Adventure

AGH, what a fiasco.  I had this interesting image and wanted to make a print to go over my fire place mantle:

PurpleLoveliness4

You’ve seen this one before.  But, over time with the proofs from the drum scan changed my tastes after they showed me a different option, and I wanted to move in a different direction:

64819-1-12x8-Drum1_Edited4_Posted

But the Print Specialist didn’t want to work on it anymore.  My husband suggested that my order wasn’t important enough (i.e. not enough income) to make it worth their while.  I worked on the Drum scan myself a bit, but wasn’t making easy progress:

EDIT4_Drum1_Posted

You can see I have quite a bit to do before it looks like the professionally done image. Then I read this Scanning Article on EMULSIVE and decided to do a little experiment of my own. I mostly learned that drum scanning a 35 mm negative is a waste of time…….So I tried a hi-resolution (6500 dpi) scan with my Epson Perfection V700.

And Mike’s Camera Store in Boulder, Colorado, was willing to work with me.  Then the lockdown happened and although my order had been placed, I had to await the re-opening to get it.  Now placed over my Mantle:

Datura_FamilyRoom

And a smaller version in my Office, which I may end up giving away……..Both wall portraits were taken with my Mamiya-7 on a tripod using Portra 400 film.

Datura_Office

Mike’s now has me as a permanent customer for color printing……..

What the Irises Tell Us About Velvia 50 and E100 Films

The Irises display more of a difference, being both richer is color and truer to the colors I saw. You’ll have to trust me on that.  I had intended to make Portra 400 images for all the garden shots, but that camera malfunctioned.  However, I do have some Portra 400 35 mm images.  One posted ant the end for comparison.  As before, you’ll have to make your choice based on which color balance you prefer.

We will start with Yellow Irises, since we did see a difference in the Yellow Tulips:

 

As before, the E100 is on the left and the Velvia 50 is on the right.  You can see the richer saturation in the Velvia 50.  Something that we are expecting.

 

Varying the contrast and brightness had no affect on the absolute color, which is what we are interested in here.

Now we move on to Purple, which was a color that Velvia 50 favored in previous examples:

 

As before, E100 on the left and Velvia 50 on the right…….

 

For me, the Velvia yields a more attractive color and is closer to what I saw.  Now let me tell you a little secret.  Once in a Physics experiment in college, it showed that I tend to see a little bit into the UV spectrum.  That is probably why the richer purples appeal more to me.

However, if you want truer color I think we have to get out the Portra 400 (below).  Again, I think it is an aesthetic choice…….

 

Portra_Purple_Iris

Second Floor Door Mystery

I never did figure out exactly how this Door was used.  Found it in an alley during a night  time Denver Workshop……

DD_Elevated

Any ideas how this door was used?

Velvia 50 vs. E100 Continues…..with Tulips

There was so much discussion after my first posting, that I’ve moved up the Film Test Series.  You seen what the Owls had to say………Now we’ll move into My Garden for the next three comparisons, and end with a road trip.

For all image sets, E100 is the first image (here the top)………Velvia 50 the second image (here the bottom).  I love these dark purple tulips…….

E100_Tulip1

I’d say these are too close to call………

Velvia_Tulip1

You may notice some fuzzy focus.  We’ve had a lot of wind lately.  Impossible to find a still day.

E100 on the Left……Velvia 50 on the right.

So theTulips didn’t prove to be much of a test. Only the red and yellow Tulips show a definite difference.  Next we’ll see what the Irises have to say…….

Prelim Discussion of IR-Sensitive B&W Films Part I: SFX-200 and Retro 80S

I typically use Ilford SFX-200 as my IR-Sensitive film.  When I started, I used it with my darkest red filter:

But now I use my IR-695 filter:

 

Recently I’ve had two IR-sensitive film come my way: Rollei Retro 80S and Washi-Z.  Let’s start with the Rollei film. Because of my positive experience using the 695 filter, I tried this with the Retro 80S.  It resulted in interesting but very high contrast images:

Retro_80S_Cathedral2

Compare this to T-MAX 400 with a Dark Red filter (sorry that’s the film I had in the other Mamiya-7 at the time):

TMAX_400_Cathedral2

Here a direct comparison of the same scene, SFX-200 and Retro 80S, both with the IR-695 filter:

Retro_80S_Cathedral1SFX_Cathedral1

Can you tell which is which? The Retro 80S is the upper image, the SFX-200 is the lower image.  The SFX image preserves the fine high altitude clouds better…..

I have recently read an article on the Retro 80S, where the author only used the dark red filter.    @EMULSIVEfilm also has another recent article comparing Retro 80S and Retro 400S, again both using the dark red filter.  So now I’m going to embark on a set of side by side Retro and SFX images making, using only the dark red filter.  Can’t wait to see what happens……

IR_Filrm_Test_120

Washi-Z discussion coming in Part II.