What I’ve learned about Lomo Purple, Pinholes and ………..

What I’ve learned is that Lomo Purple does not work well for long exposures or in bright sunlight.  I also think that the high altitude and stronger UV are a problem.  So my attempt to use Lomo Purple in my Diana Pinhole for Diana Day failed miserably.  The Featured image is the best one.  But not sure I’m going to post it on Instagram.

 

By the way, this is a Famous I.M Pei Biuilding in Boulder, Colorado.  Fortunately I was also shooting my 645 Fisheye with B&W film.  Those will post next week…….

So, other than avoiding all the conditions that I live with in Colorado (altitude, bright sunlight, high UV) any suggestions from other High Altitude Lomo Purple Users on getting better results?

I have posts from two more rolls of Lomo Purple coming soon…………

So we’ll end on a positive note with some purple loveliness taken with short exposure times (sun angle ~90 degrees):

PurpleLoveliness1

Why Fisheye?

I’ve realized that I had several Fisheye lens/camera set ups.  My First was a Zenitar Fisheye for my 35 mm Minolta Family:

 

 

Minolta Zenitar Redwoods:

Redwoods

Next I acquired a Lomo Fisheye:

PeachesBooks

Then a Fisheye attachment for the Holga.  My First Emulsive Secret Santa Gift:

Holga_Fisheye

Next A Fisheye Lens for My Diana:

Diana_Fisheye2

Wow this is out of control right?  So I thought about “Rewarding” myself with a Mamiya 645 fish eye lens after recovering from a recent illness.  The price though, was daunting  (~$1200) and I thought about how little I actually use any of my other Fisheye Lenses. Then I became aware of the Arsat Zodiak-8 Fisheye, and picked one up for $120.  In fact I bought two cameras and two lenses for the cost of the most expensive M645 Fisheye listing ($1800).

So, now for the first results from the Arsat with comparisons to my 35 mm Fisheye:

Fisheye_ChapelontheRock

Chapel on the Rock: 645 Arsat Fisheye, Peak to Peak Highway

Fisheye_TreeontheRock

Above: I call this one the “Tree on the Rock”  also Peak to Peak Highway.

Now from some side by side comparisons to my 35 mm Zenitar Fisheye )left B&W is 645; right color is 35 mm):  These were taken from the same tripod position.

 

 

 

 

 

If you are old enough to remember, the 1970’s were a Fisheye crazed time.  Even the original Hawaii 5-0 had a fisheye view of a landing plane in its Intro. But, I haven’t answered my question yet:  Why Fisheye?  Well, just for the fun of it!

Post Script:  I haven’t forgotten 9/11, I’m just not going to support the politicization of it.  I will Always Honor those who died.

B&W Flowers from My Garden

OK, I’m a believer.  Photographers were always raving about Ilford HP5.  But I didn’t share the fascination until this past Spring.  On my Journey to Phoenix I wanted to take 35 mm B&W film.  The only thing I had in the fridge was Ilford HP5.  So I grabbed the 5 rolls and headed out………

And I’ve finally discovered the situations where the ‘GRAIN” works for me.  Here is a summary of my HP5 Best Case (all HP5 except where noted):

 

 

(Note: the datura, upper right is T-MAX)

 

(Note:  Yuca Baccata, upper left, is digital IR)

September on my Other Blog is all about B&W in the Garden.

Exploring Expired Film

Recently I’ve had developed some expired film ‘given’ to me by a neighbor.  Here’s the backstory, they were moving and knew that I had an interest in film cameras.  I was given two cameras that contained partially exposed rolls of film:  A Canon Sure Shot point and shoot and a Fujica ST-705.

I told them that I would finish exposing the rolls and have them developed.  To preserve their privacy I will only share the images that I exposed to complete the rolls.  It was also at least 30 year old film not stored under the best conditions. Kudos to Old School Photo Lab for pulling these images out of very dense negatives through scanning.  The images were almost impossible to discern even using the brightest light table.

Interesting results.  First the Canon Sure Shot:  All of the Kodak GC 400 film shifted blue, but many images were salvageable when converted to B&W.  I bumped up the contrast 100-200%:

Below a comparison of the original to the B&W:

 

Next the Fujica ST-705.  Really a neat camera; lightweight and easy to figure out.  This contained some version of Kodacolor film which somewhat maintained it’s color but became very grainy and dark:

 

So where Am I going with Expired film?  It never really interested me before.  I was always in pursuit of the sharp, crisp image.  But lately I’ve drifted into pinholes and a renewed interest in plastic cameras,  which offer very different photographic characteristics.  Also recently a friend gave us a treasure trove of expired films:

Expired_Films

I gave some away to my Emulsive Secret Santa last year, who expressed an interest in expired films.  But I kept the more interesting ones….I was also given a Minox “Spy” Camera with an expired roll that I am shooting now:

Spy_Camera_Gear

In another twist I was reorganizing my 35 mm camera storage and found my Minolta SRT-202 with half a roll of unexposed T-MAX.  When did I last use  THAT camera? 4-5 years ago?  Certainly expired now.  So I have Expired films to play with…….more coming on the horizon.

Frugal Film Project: Roll #3

HearseCon 2019:

 

Sort of a Middle-Aged Goth Experience………..

Instagram censored and blurred out the second image with the pick axe.  Tooo Disturbing?

Inspired By Chris Gampat @Phoblographer: My “New” Fuji GW690 III

A while ago Chris Gampat had a very insightful article on the Phoblographer regarding the “5 of Our Favorite Film Rangefinder Cameras (One for Everyone)”  Guess what?  I bought one…….This was my first test roll through the Fuji GW690 III.  Boxed like new and delivered from Japan in a timely manner.

GW690_Cropped3GW690_Cropped4GW690_Cropped2GW690_Cropped1

Now for my Very Dramatic second roll through this camera…….Roosevelt Dam:

Roosevelt_Dam

Apache Lake, Canyon Lake and the Superstition Mountains…….

Apache_Lake_GW690IIICanyon_Lake_GW690IIISuperstition_Mtns_GW690III

The lens for the GW690III is know for it’s high contrast.  I’d never thought about lenses affecting the contrast.  But see the difference between my Mamiya 7 and this camera at the Superstition Mountains:

 

 

 

View Another Film-Lens-Contrast Example Here.

A Blog About Film and Film Cameras. Exploring My Personal Vision through the Intersection of Life & Art.

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