Tag Archives: The Story

Inner Monet and the #CameraChallenge

I am a frequent participant in the #CameraChallenge.  The April offering included a motion challenge which fits My Inner Monet.  My strategy for ‘Motion’ was slow shutter speeds and simple motion.  I used the Diana F+ camera and Lomo 800 film, as I was photographing for the April Frugal Film Project.

Wind_Walk

Above:  a walk in the wind, and Below: mountain drive by.

Mountain_Drive_By

Frugal Film Project: May 2020

The Wise Old Owl speaks for the Alley Art Amazin’ mural project in my Hometown, Lafayette, Colorado.  I started capturing these images for the Frugal Film Project and for my own interests in my Hometown’s support of the Arts.

May_Lomo800

 

Coming soon will be a discussion of the Wise Old Owl.  Turns out I have photographed this mural with 4 different color films.  And they all look different.

Below, sharing a few more murals.  I may make a Murals Page on my blog…….

 

Prelim Discussion of IR-Sensitive B&W Films Part II: Washi-Z ISO 400

Arcosanti_Yucca

Washi-Z 400, above with a dark red filter.  I start with that statement because for some reason I didn’t shoot the first few images with dark red.  Instead I had used an orange filter for some reason:

Piestewa_Peak

Washi-Films were never intended for use in still cameras.  They were specialty films and most were developed for recording some type of motion, including a sound version.But nowadays these specialty films are creeping into the revitalized 35 mm film market.

And finally, two images from the Tonto Natural Bridge in Arizona.  Representing some of the early orange filter exposures.

So now what?  I’ve ordered more Washi-Z 400, and because the IR effect did not seem that strong, even with the red filter.  I’m going to try it with the IR-695 filter.  Watch for new results coming soon……

Washi_Test

Juneteenth 2020

My husband was picking up packages at our PostNet shop.  A women had these signes printed to pass out to friends, family, and whoever she might meet.  He asked her for one and it it now in our front yard:

Juneteenth1

And a Flower to Honor all who have died recently at the hand’s of the Police……..RIP:

Juneteenth2

Learn More About Juneteenth Here.…….

Retrospective: Mission Santa Ines

And of course a Door because it is Thursday……The side entry photographed better than the Main Entrance.  You may have noticed that this is Infrared.Mission_Side_Door1Mission_Side_Door2

Mission Santa Ines is located next to Solvang, California.  It was founded in 1804. I was visiting a friend in Santa Barbara back in 2017 when I made this visit.  I decided to use my Nikon-1, which was converted to full spectrum by KolariVision.  I then used an IR filter to limit the exposure to Infrared.

Mission_Santa_Ines1

Church was in session, so I wandered around outside and focussed my photography there.  Obviously a full house with people standing in the doorway.

Views around the Courtyard,  Above Left to Right: St Francis, Shrine to Santa Ines, Jesus.

Finally, below, the Cemetery:

Mission_Cemetery1Mission_Cemetery2

I had the Nikon-1 converted after much frustration with IR-films.  I do use IR-Sensitive Films and you’ll see some film tests coming soon.

Retrospectives are repostings of significant works from my old Photo Diary……….

And, some thought from yesterday’s Photo Diary on Windows and Walls……

Prelim Discussion of IR-Sensitive B&W Films Part I: SFX-200 and Retro 80S

I typically use Ilford SFX-200 as my IR-Sensitive film.  When I started, I used it with my darkest red filter:

But now I use my IR-695 filter:

 

Recently I’ve had two IR-sensitive film come my way: Rollei Retro 80S and Washi-Z.  Let’s start with the Rollei film. Because of my positive experience using the 695 filter, I tried this with the Retro 80S.  It resulted in interesting but very high contrast images:

Retro_80S_Cathedral2

Compare this to T-MAX 400 with a Dark Red filter (sorry that’s the film I had in the other Mamiya-7 at the time):

TMAX_400_Cathedral2

Here a direct comparison of the same scene, SFX-200 and Retro 80S, both with the IR-695 filter:

Retro_80S_Cathedral1SFX_Cathedral1

Can you tell which is which? The Retro 80S is the upper image, the SFX-200 is the lower image.  The SFX image preserves the fine high altitude clouds better…..

I have recently read an article on the Retro 80S, where the author only used the dark red filter.    @EMULSIVEfilm also has another recent article comparing Retro 80S and Retro 400S, again both using the dark red filter.  So now I’m going to embark on a set of side by side Retro and SFX images making, using only the dark red filter.  Can’t wait to see what happens……

IR_Filrm_Test_120

Washi-Z discussion coming in Part II.

What 4 Owls Have Told Me About 4 Color Films

Continuing with the Showdown that I started a few days ago.  I’ve been using E100 over a year. I’m midway in a film showdown between Kodak E100 vs Fuji Velvia 50.  I had always preferred Kodak in the past, however, after some 35 mm experiences last year I had doubts.  I had always used E100GX, a warm toned film of the old generation.  The new film was based on a colder version E100G.  But to be fair, I decided to do some formal color test comparison.  This is Part,  I am comparing four images of the Owl Mural made with four different films: E100, Velvia 50, Portra 400 and Lomo 800.  For the direct comparison of the E-6 films I used my Mamiya-7’s; the Portra was exposed using a Mamiya-6; and the Lomo 800 was exposed using a Diana F+, for the Frugal Film Project.

First I’ll show them in pairs, then break down my critique of each one.  Naturally I have selected my personal favorite for the Header image above.

Left: Lomo 800; Right: Portra 400.  I made no adjustments for tone or contrast; only cropping to make them comparable in size. All of the image were exposed on overcast days. The first comment I can make is that both C-41 films are truer to the actual mural colors.  The Portra 400 has a richer color tone which I would expect for the lower ISO film.  But you have to admit that the Lomo 800 is very good, especially since it was exposed using a plastic camera.  The winner here is Kodak Portra 400:

Owl_Portra400_Labels
Portra 400

Now for the main event, E100 (left) vs Velvia 50 (right):

As one would expect, the E-6 films have a more saturated color.  Not quite a natural representation.  But in my lifetime experience with film (going back to childhood)  I’ve mostly shot E-6.  As a field scientist back in the pre-PowerPoint days, I needed to show my information in slide presentations.  So that meant E-6 films.  In my earlier professional days I used ECN films.  When that was discontinued I switched to Kodak E100GX.

If you read my earlier experiences with E100, you’ll be able to decide which one I prefer.  I simply find the E100 too cold. So the Winner here is, Fuji Velvia 50.  I enjoy the richer and brighter blues and purples……

Owl_Velvia50_Labels
Fuji Velvia 50

So these are my two favorites.  I can accept either one depending on what I am trying to demonstrate.  Which one do you prefer?

Stay tuned, right now I am continuing the side-by-side testing of these films as my Mamiya 645’s take a tour of my flower and vegetable gardens.  I’m going to give E100 every possible chance to show me something that I’ll like.

And I may do a follow-up Road-Trip landscape comparison.  In that case, I’ll see if a warming filter makes me feel better about the new Kodak E100.

Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph

Today’s door, from the First Floor Interior Main Hallway T-intersection:

Phone_Company

When you turn right at the intersection above, you’re headed towards the Elevators…..More Doors, Right? And you are looking towards the main entrance door from the lobby at the end of this hall.

DODenver3

And some interior details:

These images are from a Doors Open Denver tour in 2014, sponsored by the Denver Architecture Foundation.

Kodak E100 vs. Fuji Velvia 50: The Showdown Begins

I have to admit that I was disappointed with early my 35 mm E100 results.  I felt that the film was cold and realized that it was based on the old E100G, a film I only used with a warming filter.  My favorite of the old Kodak E-6 films was E100GX, the warm toned film.  I used it extensively in Patagonia and mourned its loss.  You can also check out our first Patagonia Calendar.

But I digress.  Let’s get back to the purpose of this study: Kodak E100 versus Fuji Velvia 50.  After my E100 doubts I happened upon this old Velvia 50 image of Boreas Pass and thought about a comparative test:

BoreasChasingFall

So I set up my two Mamiya 6X7’s for the test.  There was one difference:  The Velvia 50 camera had a 43 mm lens and the E100 camera had a 50 mm lens.  We can debate if that makes a difference, but for Showdown Part II, I’ll be using matching camera set ups.  So hold your argument for later.

Here are the side-by-sides: Think about which is which and I’ll tell you at the end.Peacocks_E100Peacocks_Velvia50

Owl_E100Owl_Velvia50

Details regarding what I learned from this Owl are discussed in my next posting…………

Coke_E100Coke_Velvia50

In all cases the top image is Kodak E100 and the bottom image is Fuji Velvia 50.  There were no adjustments made to color balance.  You may note that the Velvia 50 images are more color saturated and have some purple or pink in the sky.  The E100 is less saturated and has a colder sky. Now it’s up to you.  Which do you prefer?  Keep in mind that this is an overcast sky.  So I’ll add one more pair.  I wanted to capture my purple house, but in the morning the house was too dark.  But you can see that with a clear sky the Velvia 50 (bottom image) has the saturated blue sky:

Sky_E100Sky_Velvia50

The snow is still holding that purple cast in the Velvia 50 image.  E100 has a truer presentation of the snow.  Comments, perspectives appreciated.

Next, we’ll take a look at my Garden Flowers using my Mamiya 645’s both with 80 mm macro lenses..  Since I have something blooming all summer, I’m shooting two rolls of each film throughout my gardening season, and I’ll post as I go……..

Loving End to a Rough Couple of Weeks

I hope the my readers are aware of what has been going on in Society.  All I can say is that an African-American Woman, if has had a powerful effect on me.  But Friday a lovely thing occurred.  I found the Stone and Note on my Door Step:

HOPE

This was great to find after I discovered a disappointment at the Park on Friday.  First the Rock Tribute to Victims of COVID:

Lafayette2A

We had captured a Black Lives Matter Stone, placed there, we thought, because of how much harder the African American Community has been hit by COVID:

Lafayette1

Last Friday this had been removed by someone who felt threatened and hateful.  But later that evening I found this Stone of Hope on my doorstep from a neighbor:

HOPE

And My Day Ended Well!