Tag Archives: Minolta

November #CameraChallenge: Part II Shadows

Organizing my cameras again, I found two of my 35 mm cameras had been put away with partially exposed rolls of film.  So I took them out to finish the rolls for the #camerachallenge. : one Portra 400 and one HP5.  So I have both color and B&W to share:

Portra 400:

TheBell

My Arcosanti Bell

For me, Shadow often means Light!   To make a Shadow you need the Light

WallShadows2

View of Shadows in the same Window a few hours apart.  Shadows move and change with the Light.

WallShadows1

My Home has a lot of windows….so I have a lot of Shadows Indoors.

SatelliteDish

But there are Shadows outside as well.  Above: what would I do without my satellite television.  Below:  A tree and it’s shadow on a neighbor’s house.

TreeShadow

 

Minolta XD-11: The Best Camera That Nobody Wanted

I came across an article on-line regarding “High Water Marks” for various camera brands. It seems to support my statement that the XD-11 was the BEST camera that nobody wanted. Making its appearance in 1977, the XD-11 was part of the late 70’s technology boom in lens development and film quality.

XD-11

Winning Features:

  • Auto Exposure with both Aperture Priority and Shutter Speed Priority options
  • Programmable override for Shutter Speed Priority
  • Excellent viewing screen (very bright)
  • Great ergonomics
  • Leaf Shutter

Leaf_Shutter

The quality of Minolta MD Rokker lenses is also vastly under-rated. This may have been due to mass marketing to amateurs with little attention to attracting the professional photographer. In turn, lack of professional exposure discouraged amateurs, etc, eventually killing the Brand, although their recent technology was purchased by Sony.

I experienced this ‘disdain’ when I returned to college after my Christmas break freshman year with a Minolta SRT-SCII, marked down to discount prices because of the new XD- models. One of my wealthier friends returned with a Canon AE-1, but since my photos were often much better than hers I didn’t let it phase me.

I had already upgraded to the X-700 in the late 1980’s.  Then I heard about this wonderful camera:  The XD-11. I have three XD-Series. My first XD-11 (Shown above) has been sent to the ‘parts’ box due an unfixable film advance problem.  The second one that I acquired is a Japan Market model that is labelled XD, but not Minolta. Number 3 & 4 are both XD-11’s with black bodies.

DSC_8846

Regarding the XD-model, I wondered if I had been scammed, but I took it to my local repair shop and he immediately recognized it.  Told me that for a while the Minolta Cameras left off the Japanese manufacturer’s name in hopes of improving market share.  Mine had probably been brought back to the U.S. by an American Serviceman.

Check out my recent Article in 35mmc featuring the XD-11.

Lomo Purple Revisited: Lessons Learned Part II

PurpleLoveliness4

Lomo Purple is definitely an interesting film.  I had never tried a ‘special effects’ film before.  And surprisingly, I like it.  But there are some caveats that never seem to be mentioned in Lomo Purple posts and promotions,

So this is more of a user’s guide than a film review.  I’ll let you try the film and decide if you like it. FIRST:  the angle of the sun with respect to your image scene is the biggest factor for a successful image.  I’ve discussed in a Lomo Purple is definitely an interesting film.  I had never tried a ‘special effects’ film before.  And surprisingly, I like it.  But there are some caveats that never seem to be mentioned in Lomo Purple posts and promotions, I have touched upon this in previous post and hope to publish a full summary review of my experiences soon.  But note that the ideal sun angle is 90 to 180 degrees from the image scene.  In my most recent Lomo Purple roll shown here, I was careful with the sun angle.

 

I have one more roll of medium format Lomo Purple being developed now.  I also plan on running an exposure time test for the RSS Pinhole.  AND in a few weeks I expect an @35mmc summary article of My Lomo Purple experiences to be published.

B&W Flowers from My Garden

OK, I’m a believer.  Photographers were always raving about Ilford HP5.  But I didn’t share the fascination until this past Spring.  On my Journey to Phoenix I wanted to take 35 mm B&W film.  The only thing I had in the fridge was Ilford HP5.  So I grabbed the 5 rolls and headed out………

And I’ve finally discovered the situations where the ‘GRAIN” works for me.  Here is a summary of my HP5 Best Case (all HP5 except where noted):

 

 

(Note: the datura, upper right is T-MAX)

 

(Note:  Yuca Baccata, upper left, is digital IR)

September on my Other Blog is all about B&W in the Garden.

B&W Flowers

Something that I want to spend more time on……..B&W Flowers.  More from the Mayo Clinic Cactus Garden……

B&W_White_Flower1

 

Above:  same flowers, different perspectives.

Below: Same Flowers, different f-stops; right has more bokeh.

 

 

Cactus_B&W_Saguaro

 

Cactus_B&W_Agave

My home garden is blooming….time to move outside and work on some local B&W Flower Portraits.

 

P.S. : I will actually have more B&W flowers coming in August. Developed a roll recently that is all flowers from my garden.

Kodak ColorPlus 200 comparison to Kodak E100 in the Cactus Garden

I decided to use Kodak Color Plus 200 for my Frugal Film Project.  However, I didn’t have the camera that I planned to use with me in Arizona.  So I did a preliminary film test using my Minolta X-700.  Here I present side by side color rendering examples from both films:

For all of these examples, Kodak E100 (@EI 125) is on the left and Kodak ColorPlus 200 is on the right.

Here I don’t think I’m showing precisely the same orange cactus flower; but it gives you an idea.

As with my previous experience all of the E100 is colder. And we know I prefer the warmer colors…………